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Dr. Karl R.O.S. Johnson's Chronic Condition Natural Treatment Blog

Intentional musings of a unique Shelby Township Michigan Chiropractic Physician dedicated to helping people find solutions to improving their health by rooting out causes to chronic conditions such as fibromyalgia, stubborn thyroid disorder symptoms, balance disorders, chronic knee & shoulder pain, migraines, sciatica, ADD/ADHD/ASD, back pain, peripheral neuropathy, gluten sensitivity and autoimmune disorders so they can Reclaim Their Life!

From the Desk of Dr. Karl R.O.S. Johnson, DC.....

Get To Know Type 5 ADD

Posted by Dr. Karl R.O.S. Johnson, DC on Mon, Nov 20, 2017

ADD - Type 5

Here we are, already, at part five in the series of articles where I explain some of the details of the seven types of ADD.  Type 5 is also called Limbic ADD. This type of ADD is where depression and ADD intersect each other. The core ADD symptoms are present with the additional symptoms of negativity, moodiness, sadness, low energy, lower motivation and a decreased zest for living. Typically, we want our cognitive areas of the brain to have increased activity and our emotional  center to be less active, which will create a generally positive, more hopeful, centered state of mind. In Limbic ADD, as this emotional area of our brain (limbic area) increases in activity, we tend to develop a more negative outlook on life.
 
"Limbic ADD is often responsible for failed marriages. The low sexual interest, tiredness, feelings of being constantly overwhelmed, and lack of attention to detail often cause marital conflict. Treating Limbic ADD can literally save families and change a person’s life." [1]
 
As with all the other ADD types, a we correlate the patient's qEEG findings with their clinical history. To be accurate in our evaluation, when we see negativity, low motivation, low energy, depression, which is common in Type 5 ADD, correlating history and brain map (QEEG) results will assist with correct ADD/ADHD classification.

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Topics: ADHD, Neurofeedback, Functional Neurology, Nutritional Help, Type 5 ADD

Get To Know Type 4 ADD

Posted by Dr. Karl R.O.S. Johnson, DC on Tue, Nov 14, 2017

ADD - Type 4

Welcome to part four of the series of articles where I explain some of the details of the seven types of ADD.  Type 4 is also called Temporal Lobe ADD. The temporal lobes are the part of the brain near your temple area and behind your eyes. Temporal lobes have a lot to do with emotionality, memory, learning, mood stability and visual processing of objects. So, when we run a brain map (qEEG), we look for different patterns, and Type 4 is one of those patterns that we look for. As with all the other ADD types, we correlate the qEEG findings with the patient's clinical history. Although moodiness, agressiveness and memory problems are notable with Type 4 ADD, the best way to determine the type of ADHD is by using patient history and brain mapping (QEEG) in order for the ADD/ADHD classifications to be more accurately determined.
 
Type 4, is also called Temporal Lobe  ADD. "Temporal Lobe ADD is commonly associated with learning and behavioral problems. It is often seen in people with ADD who struggle with mood instability, irritability, dyslexia, and memory problems.  Associated with domestic violence and suicidal thoughts, this type of ADD can ruin a family." [1]   When we have a temporal lobe issue, we can have somebody that's maybe morally rigid in their view of the world. They might have unpredictable moods. They might be angry. These kids kind of struggle to get to know people and have relationships, so they may interpret comments towards them as negative even when they're not. They tend to have a darker, negative view of the world. They may have had a history of head trauma, which could be a full-blown concussion even a mild head injury.

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Topics: ADHD, Neurofeedback, Functional Neurology, Nutritional Help, Type 4 ADD

Brain Laser [Transcranial Photobiomodulation] improves brain blood flow and energy production [Video]

Posted by Dr. Karl R.O.S. Johnson, DC on Tue, Nov 07, 2017

Brain Laser or transcranial photobiomodulation can improve blood flow and improve healing in the brain.

Many health conditions can benefit from brain laser. Photobiomodulation improves brain blood flow and energy production. Dr. Karl R.O.S. Johnson, DC demonstrates how safe this therapy is for brain health. Laser can improve cognition, memory, depression, ability to focus and help the brain heal after a concussion. This is just one of the advanced techniques used at Johnson Chiropractic Neurology & Nutrition and Clear Mind Institute of Southeast Michigan for Brain Wellness.

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Topics: ADHD, Anxiety, Cold Laser, Transcranial Photobiomodulation, Photobiomodulation, Robotic Laser

How are ADHD and Nutrition Connected?

Posted by Dr. Karl R.O.S. Johnson, DC on Mon, Jul 17, 2017

The relationship between ADHD and nutrition has been extensively studied for several decades with most results indicating an association between the role of diet and the symptoms of ADHD but offer no clear link concerning causality towards ADHD. In other words, while nutrition can have an effect on the symptoms of ADHD, nutrition is not a direct cause, nor does it offer a cure for ADHD. Therefore, understanding the role of ADHD and nutrition can potentially help an individual reduce the impacts of ADHD symptoms but any alterations to the normal diet should be associated with additional treatment options.

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Topics: ADHD, Nutritional Deficiency

Get To Know Type 3 ADD

Posted by Dr. Karl R.O.S. Johnson, DC on Thu, May 04, 2017

ADD - Type 3

Welcome to part three of the series of articles where I explain some of the details of the seven types of ADD. In a way Type 3 ADD is opposite of type 1. Imagine someone being so overfocused that they seem to not be paying attention, but rather they are hyperfocused and have issues with shifting attention. Even though the tendency to overfocus is a key attribute of Type 3 ADD, the best way to determine the type of ADHD is by using patient history and brain mapping (QEEG) and the ADD/ADHD classifications can be more accurately determined.
 
Type 3, also called Overfocused  ADD. Those with overfocused ADD tend to have excessive activity in the middle of the brain. Because they have trouble shifting attention it makes them appear as though they cannot pay attention. Those with type 3 often have hard time with change and also often have difficulties with clothing. They may also have Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD) or Obsessive Compulsive Personality Disorder (OCPD), more commonly seen in children and grandchildren of alcoholics and substance abusers. Tourette’s Syndrome AKA Gilles De La Tourette’s Syndrome is also associated with Type 3. A person with Tourette’s can have tics that are vocal and/or motor in nature (or both). It is estimated that 60% of those with Tourette’s Syndrome (TS) have ADD
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Topics: ADHD, Neurofeedback, Functional Neurology, Nutritional Help, Type 3 ADD

Get To Know Type 2 ADD

Posted by Dr. Karl R.O.S. Johnson, DC on Thu, Apr 27, 2017

ADD - Type 2

This is the second part of the series of articles where I explain some of the details of the seven types of ADD. Type 2 ADD is quite a bit different than type 1.  Remember the best way to determine the type of ADHD is by using patient history and brain mapping (QEEG) and the ADD/ADHD classifications can be more accurately determined.
 
Type 2, also called Inattentive ADD. This type is described as daydreamers, space cadets, or couch potatoes. Their brain map reveals a high theta overall. Many of these cases never get diagnosed or treated and clinicians often tend to tire of treating many of these kids and adults. They are seen as couch potatoes. In class they often daydream and are lost in themselves. They have trouble finding interests and motivation. This type of ADD is more commonly seen in females.
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Topics: ADHD, Neurofeedback, Functional Neurology, Nutritional Help, Type 2 ADD

Myths and Facts about ADD

Posted by Dr. Karl R.O.S. Johnson, DC on Sat, Apr 22, 2017

When I write blog articles and posts on social media about ADD or ADHD, occasionally someone will strongly voice there opinion that ADD is a myth (okay, really sometimes they are downright rude and obnoxious about it...and I hide, ban and delete their posts). Thay assert ADD is a made-up concoction by teachers or doctors or the medical establishment. Typically the post is written hastily with no argument to back up their point of view.

I wanted to provide a more balanced view and couldn't find a more eloquenty stated, concise source than the quoted material from Dr. Daniel Amen, MD you see below. 

Dr. Amen is a physician, double board certified psychiatrist and ten-time New York Times bestselling author.

He is the Founder and CEO of Amen Clinics in Costa Mesa and San Francisco, California, Bellevue, Washington, Reston, Virginia, Atlanta, Georgia and New York City.  Amen Clinics have the world’s largest database of functional brain scans relating to behavior, totaling nearly 100,000 scans on patients from 111 countries. Dr. Amen is also a Distinguished Fellow of the American Psychiatric Association, the highest award they give members.

Sorting the Facts from the Myths

"ADD is not even new in the medical literature. George Still, a pediatrician at the turn of the last century, described children who were hyperactive, inattentive, and impulsive. Unfortunately, he labeled them “morally defective.” During the great flu epidemic of 1918, many children also contracted viral encephalitis and meningitis. Of those who survived the brain infections, many were described with symptoms now considered classic for ADD. By the 1930s, the label “minimal brain damage” was coined to describe these children. The label was changed in the 1960s to “minimal brain dysfunction” because no anatomical abnormality could be found in the children. Whatever its name, ADD has been part of the psychiatric terminology since the inception of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual (DSM) in 1952. (The DSM is the diagnostic bible listing clinical criteria for various psychiatric disorders). Every version of the DSM has described the core symptoms of ADD, albeit by a different name every time." 
“An estimated seventeen million people in the United States have attention deficit disorder (ADD), which was later renamed as attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). I prefer the name ADD, as ADHD highlights the hyperactive component of the disorder (H) and discards half the people who have it, particularly girls, who are typically not hyperactive. According to the CDC, 13.2 percent of boys at one time have been diagnosed with ADD, 5.6 percent of girls.

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Topics: ADD, ADHD

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